Can You Reuse Scented Candle Wax? Find Out Here!

Can you reuse scented candle wax? The answer is a resounding yes!

This blog post will talk about can you reuse scented candle wax and how to do it. It includes tips on what can be done with the old candles as well.

When you have a fragrance that is no longer your favorite, it can be hard to know what to do with the old candle. It may not seem right to just throwing them out because they are still somewhat usable.

Here’s our guide on what to do with leftover candle wax:

Can you reuse scented candles? Hot Tip: Scents can be stored in a cool, dark place like the back of your fridge for up to two years. If you have some leftover wax that’s not quite as fragrant or has lost its scent altogether, follow these steps for how to revive it.

The freezing method

The freezing method can be a good way to reuse old candles. This technique involves removing the wick, and then storing it in an airtight container or plastic bag.

 After that, you will insert your candle into a bowl of water (or some other cold liquid) with ice cubes for five minutes before stirring up the waxes when they start to thicken after cooling down again.

 For this process, we recommend using food-grade paraffin wax because beeswax is not suitable for this kind of recycling due to its quality as well as toxic emissions from burning it at a high temperature which may cause health problems if inhaled over time.

 When taking out your candle, make sure you use gloves so that you don’t get any wax on your hands.

 The wicks can be reused up to 20 times, so it is a cost-effective way of getting more mileage out of old candles and saving money at the same time!

The melting method

Some people can be lazy when it comes to melting the wax in a scented candle. They may just throw away the old, used putty and use new one with each time they light up their candles.

Others are careful about not wasting any of this material for making those wonderful smelling aromas that fill up our homes and make us feel so cozy on cold winter nights.

The boiling water method

You can reuse scented candle wax by boiling a pot of water and submerging the jar or container full of used candle wax in it for at least 30 minutes.

This will melt away any remaining leftover wick residue that’s left on there, but don’t leave anything else like paper towels or plastic wrap sitting on top because these things can cause the molten liquid to splash out over everything.

The boiling water method is a great way to reuse your scented candle wax. Boil enough water so that you can fill the bottom of an empty pot, and then put in the wick from your used candles into it.

Be sure not to touch any hot parts with hands or utensils because this could cause burns! Once the water has cooled down (usually after about 30 minutes), take out the wicks and pour off all excess liquid—now they’re ready for another round of use!

What is wrong with reusing spent?

If you want to reuse your spent candle wax then there are different opinions out there as to what is the best way to do it.

Some say you can simply scrape off all the leftover bits from previous burns and mix them together until it becomes a liquid form again before pouring into another container or jar for storing.

This is a relatively quick way and probably the easiest of all.

What should you do if your wax has started to solidify?

On the other hand, some say that when candlewick is on the verge of burning out or it already has then people can pour their leftover spent wax into coffee mugs or small containers with lids before refrigerating them overnight until they cool down completely.

This will allow for easy remelting in another container without any risk of spilling over onto anything else because it is now solidified again.

The next day put back into its original scented candle jar and use as usual like nothing ever happened.

Can’t make up your mind which one to choose?

Both ways work but there are also other ways to reuse your candle wax if those two methods didn’t work out for you.

Other options:

You can also pour the leftover spent candle wax into small jars or containers with lids and freeze them overnight until they are solidified again, then remelt in another container without any risk of spilling over onto anything else because it is now solidified again.

The next day put back into its original scented jar or tin like nothing ever happened.

Or you can cut up a piece of cardboard into squares about an inch wide and place one on top of each wick before lighting the candles so that when they burn down all the way there will be plenty left which can be reused as usual by pouring it straight from the can or jar into the candle holder.

Or you can use a pencil to put a small hole in the bottom of your airtight glass container, then pour some melted wax and seal it up with plaster of Paris like before when pouring hot liquid wax onto paper.

The only difference is that you’ll have an opening at the very top which will allow for easy removal because all the wax inside has been solidified from storage overnight.

Other alternatives:

You can also reuse scented candle jars by simply washing them out with soap and water after they’ve served their purpose!

For this method, however, be sure not to get any residual soapy residue on the outside surface (which might lead to frosting) as this could cause the wax to not adhere properly.

Tips for using leftover scented candle jars:

Some great ideas are storing small items like jewelry, screws, and nails, or even use them as old-fashioned pencil holders!

You can also fill the jar up with stuff that’s been in your fridge too long – this will create a lovely DIY refrigerator deodorizer which is sure to come in handy during hectic holiday times when it seems everything has gone bad at once. Plus you get a nice homemade Christmas present out of it all!

If you have any leftover wax crumbs from cutting up a candle then simply add them to the top of an unlit one. This will create instant votive candles!

Candle wicks can also be reused when they are not too dirty and start to fray at the end – just cut off what remains with scissors. Give it a light trim if necessary but don’t worry too much as this is more aesthetic than anything else. Tie on some new string (waxed cotton thread or embroidery floss) and use like before.

Lastly, many people might remember seeing in their grandmothers craft room that there was always old jars handy for storing buttons, ribbons, and all sorts of other supplies. An old canning jar or even a large glass tumbler can become the perfect container to store smaller items such as matches, crayons, paintbrushes…

Now it’s time for you to get creative! The answer is anything your imagination desires because what doesn’t turn into something useful?

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